WILL I NEED TO TAKE EXTRA TIME OFF FROM WORK?

No. Normal activities may be resumed immediately. Low impact aerobic activity, such as walking, is encouraged.

HOW LONG DOES TREATMENT TAKE FOR VARICOSE VEINS?

Plan to be in the office for at least 1 1/2 hours for your first ablation procedure. The actual procedure is approximately 60 minutes. We monitor each patient after each procedure. You will be re-checked periodically to evaluate your progress. Great results and symptomatic relief usually last quite long term, however, maintenance injections may be needed in the future.

WON’T I NEED MY VEINS?

Procedures like venous ablation and ultrasound guided sclerotherapy close off abnormally functioning veins. The vein being closed is dysfunctional and is allowing blood to flow backwards and pool, so leaving it open only makes things worse. The body contains numerous other healthy veins that are still functional and can easily take up the additional flow. Treatment of the diseased veins almost always results in improved blood flow.

CAN VARICOSE VEINS BE PREVENTED?

The number one risk factor for developing varicose veins is heredity/genetics-many people have a predisposition to developing varicose veins. While you can’t change the genes you were born with there are some things you can do to slow the progression of venous insufficiency. This includes routine exercise, maintaining a normal weight, avoiding excessively long periods of standing or sitting and the use of compression stockings.

WHAT ARE THE POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS IF I DO NOT HAVE TREATMENT FOR MY VARICOSE VEINS?

There are several adverse consequences of untreated varicose veins. Over time, untreated varicose veins may cause swelling and changes in your skin to occur. Your skin may turn a brownish color near the ankles and may become rough and itchy. The skin may ultimately break down, causing a leg wound or ulceration. In rare cases these ulcers may hemorrhage (bleed) or become cancerous. Finally In some cases of significantly advanced disease of large varicose veins, spontaneous phlebitis and or thrombosis (clot) may occur with the associated risk of pulmonary emboli.